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Blogging Beyond the Numbers

IRS Audit
Posted by: Mike Scholz 1 year ago
If you recently filed your 2016 income tax return (rather than filing for an extension) you may now be wondering whether it’s likely that your business could be audited by the IRS based on your filing. Here’s what every business owner should know about the process. Catching the IRS’s eye Many business audits occur randomly, but a variety of tax-return-related items are likely to raise red flags with...
real estate taxes
Posted by: Mike Scholz 1 year ago
Income and losses from investment real estate or rental property are passive by definition — unless you’re a real estate professional. Why does this matter? Passive income may be subject to the 3.8% net investment income tax (NIIT), and passive losses generally are deductible only against passive income, with the excess being carried forward. Of course the NIIT is part of the Affordabl...
Posted by: Mike Scholz 1 year ago
Each year, millions of taxpayers claim an income tax refund. To be sure, receiving a payment from the IRS for a few thousand dollars can be a pleasant influx of cash. But it means you were essentially giving the government an interest-free loan for close to a year, which isn’t the best use of your money. Fortunately, there is a way to begin collecting your 2017 refund now: You can review the amou...
Home related tax deduction
Posted by: Mike Scholz 1 year ago
Currently, home ownership comes with many tax-saving opportunities. Consider both deductions and exclusions when you’re filing your 2016 return and tax planning for 2017: Property tax deduction Property tax is generally fully deductible — unless you’re subject to the alternative minimum tax (AMT). Mortgage interest deduction You generally can deduct interest on up to a combined total of ...
American Opportunity credit
Posted by: Mike Scholz 1 year ago
If you have a child in college, you may be eligible to claim the American Opportunity credit on your 2016 income tax return. If, however, your income is too high, you won’t qualify for the credit — but your child might. There’s one potential downside: If your dependent child claims the credit, you must forgo your dependency exemption for him or her. And the child can’t take the exemption. ...
Posted by: Mike Scholz 1 year ago
It’s not uncommon for adult children to help support their aging parents. If you’re in this position, you might qualify for the adult-dependent exemption. It allows eligible taxpayers to deduct up to $4,050 for each adult dependent claimed on their 2016 tax return. Basic qualifications For you to qualify for the adult-dependent exemption, in most cases your parent must have less gross...
Safe Harbor Deduction
Posted by: Mike Scholz 1 year ago
If last year your business made repairs to tangible property, such as buildings, machinery, equipment or vehicles, you may be eligible for a valuable deduction on your 2016 income tax return. But you must make sure they were truly “repairs,” and not actually “improvements.” Why? Costs incurred to improve tangible property must be depreciated over a period of years. But costs incurred on inc...
speedometer
Posted by: Mike Scholz 1 year ago
Rather than keeping track of the actual cost of operating a vehicle, employees and self-employed taxpayers can use a standard mileage rate to compute their deduction related to using a vehicle for business. But you might also be able to deduct miles driven for other purposes, including medical, moving and charitable purposes. What are the deduction rates? The rates vary depending on the purpose and the ye...
Gift Tax Return
Posted by: Mike Scholz 1 year ago
Last year you may have made significant gifts to your children, grandchildren or other heirs as part of your estate planning strategy. Or perhaps you just wanted to provide loved ones with some helpful financial support. Regardless of the reason for making a gift, it’s important to know under what circumstances you’re required to file a gift tax return. Some transfers require a return even if y...
ISOs
Posted by: Mike Scholz 1 year ago
Incentive stock options allow you to buy company stock in the future at a fixed price equal to or greater than the stock’s fair market value on the grant date. If the stock appreciates, you can buy shares at a price below what they’re then trading for. However, complex tax rules apply to this type of compensation. Current tax treatment ISOs must comply with many rules but receive tax-favored treatment...